The Race and Wealth Podcast Network

PREACH 11: White supremacy is a pre-existing condition

June 20, 2020 The Race & Wealth Team on how to close the racial wealth divide through art, media, policy, literacy, and action
The Race and Wealth Podcast Network
PREACH 11: White supremacy is a pre-existing condition
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The Race and Wealth Podcast Network
PREACH 11: White supremacy is a pre-existing condition
Jun 20, 2020
The Race & Wealth Team on how to close the racial wealth divide through art, media, policy, literacy, and action

Today we're going to be talking about a report that is going to be coming out next week. And it's something that has been a part of this country since its inception. 
White supremacy and white supremacy as a pre-existing condition.  

Show Notes Transcript

Today we're going to be talking about a report that is going to be coming out next week. And it's something that has been a part of this country since its inception. 
White supremacy and white supremacy as a pre-existing condition.  

Dyalekt :

To make you feel safe, a couple people had to get displaced. But right up the block, an unarmed black man got shot. And to keep his job, another brother had to cut off his locks. And you scared I'll force you to be PC man, you must be on PCP, I don't know much. So they know what to say lunch. So they know what to say I don't know much appreciated. They know what to say much. Racism is on beastmode and only music soothes the Savage. So we got to preach to the choir so they know what to sing. This is the preach to the choir podcast where we explore how culture affects the racial wealth divide and vice versa. Recorded wherever we at, our place your place. Were here with you in your minds in the back of your head sitting on your shoulder telling you what to do. We got our own hosts Diedrich Asante Mohamad, Chief of Race, Wealth and Community at NCRC. Pamela Capaled, CFP and owner of Brunch & Budget and Dyaleckt. I'm the guy who talks too much, but it's all right because we don't get it. Preach to the choir as part of the Race and Wealth Network. I'm your sound provider Dyaleckt, and here are your hosts Pam Capaled, Diedrich Asante Mohamad and me.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Your our hosts. And we have a special guests, Isaghani. Hello, Isaghani. Thank you for joining us. Yes, no, we planned this show a month ago and I was like, should we prepare on our topic is gonna be in Diedrich was like, well, let's just see what happens. I'm sure things will be different in a month. And here we are. So today we're going to be talking about actually a report that is going to be coming out next week. And it's something that has been a part of this country since its inception, white supremacy and white supremacy as an existing condition.

Dyalekt :

I like to they're playing off of the whole healthcare thing which is also all tied to together and interrelated, but also like, that's the thing with America, America's greatness and it was founded and founding fathers and all that. No matter what you think of the ideals of America, there is always been this rotten root that has made it so we don't have a real foundation. Yeah. And that rock is white supremacy. It's something that, you know, if you could say, came kind of over from England as they were building that whole empire, but it really set root in America and started to dig into and infect every facet of everything we do.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

So white supremacy is not just Nazis and Fox News?

Dyalekt :

Way before Nazis in Fox News.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Because that's what lots of us think of when we hear that phrase, right? Yeah. And you're like, I'm not a white supremacist, like what do you mean?

Dyalekt :

I'm forgetting the author's name, and I don't have my glasses in front of me to look at notes. But there's that novel that we have that I've been reading Hitler's American model. Talk about Nazis got their whole idea of Nazi-ism from Jim Crow. They sent some German folks over to look at what was going on and the most terrible thing about it is the conclusion that's really like I had to put down the book for about two weeks when I read the part where they said the conclusion was, they're going to use Jim Crow, but only up to a point because they felt that it was okay to murder and exile the Jews and Romani and gays and all the people that they thought but they thought it was an extra level of cruelty to keep them around as a pet. Which is what America was doing with black people. So if you're talking about like Nazis and all that you're not wrong, but they're so far from the root. I'm and telling you that root rot is deep. It's why it's messed up white folks, like I'm sorry, it'd be messed up sometimes when you're like, wait, that came from racism. Yeah, because again, the foundation is rotten.

Diedrich Asante Mohamad :

No, that's, that's been a big critique of mine around people who are too hesitant to use white supremacy because they use white supremacy just for clan just for neo nazis, but they don't understand that, you know, economic policy is the foundation of white supremacy, right? That not hiring, not doing loans, all of those things. It used to be you need violence is the foundation of white supremacy. To meet some of that violence. That's where you're seeing this police brutality aspect. But it's also gonna be in banks and nonprofits and foundations as well.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Well, that's Wow, that's real because I feel like that, again, we think of white supremacy as this violent thing. But I think what the point that you're making in this sense is that white supremacy is systemic. And white supremacy affects social political, economic, it affects everyones stuff. So Oh, yeah. Hitler's American model by James Whitman?

Dyalekt :

James Whitman, that's his name. Thank you.

Diedrich Asante Mohamad :

Thank you Monica for that. Like I don't really know IG Live so I will try to plug back people and stuff but I don't know how to do that but uh, thank you, Monica for that and thank you Sondra, for coming on. And I in my in my new six year old will be running in and out of this as well as we talked about light subjects like white supremacy and changing capitalism, right.

Dyalekt :

Light subjects I get what you're trying?

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Oh, Sandra, Sage money. Here's the rub. Even using the word supremacy is problematic because so many people believe that white people are superior to everyone else, even if they are not willing to say it.

Dyalekt :

Yeah, that's a tough thing. You know, I said this in a post that we put up and it's about how white supremacy is very much an Okie doke on white people. Where they're like they're giving them they're selling them this idea that you are better than folks and you know, the Lyndon Johnson quote about you know, if you can sell the lowest white man that they're better than the best black man, then they won't mind you going in their pockets. And what's really ill about all of this like when you talk about police violence being used to backup this economic stuff, you know, white supremacy is more of an economic thing, a cold business decision and a marketing plan built around that. And what's really ill is what you said about these companies using black folks labor while state violence police by is used to keep them from asking for more. The literal same rhetoric was used hundred years ago, 200 years ago that we're using today, some of the same stuff that you'll see these Police Chief's saying now is What was said then, and some of the same economic reasons and some of the same moral, I guess, rationalizations that people are using are the same ones you'll see used back then.

Diedrich Asante Mohamad :

Yeah. And that's why I think in order to deal with the protests around police brutality, like, my concern is that we really, that police brutality comes out of the need, you know, you're gonna have a radically unequal economy, and you're going to separate it and disenfranchised that way that does require violence, right. And we can look back at individual police officers and say they're bad, but there's a reason why this keeps happening. And it's because of the system's actually requires a brutal enforcement mechanism to concentration of wealth, and white supremacy. So all these things have to go hand in hand. If you really want to stop this police brutality you've been dealing with for, you know, centuries.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

You just blew my mind a little. I didn't think about that connection, because we talked about the racial wealth divide a lot on this show. But the reason for policing needing to exist is because of such is because of how huge the racial divide is because of these economic, like gaps, essentially, where people are so disenfranchised, that they're like, well, what else are we going to do right? And for the elite to be able to control them essentially or to control us is they need a police force for the police force was never for us. The police force was for the wealthy elite in general.

Diedrich Asante Mohamad :

And there's and there's more and more writings coming out about how much of policing stems from slave patrols for doing patrols around Native Americans and trying to keep them, you know, away or in line or what have you know, and again, the title of that report. White supremacy is a preexisting condition like we do have to get the foundation. I always say, the foundation of racial economic and the foundation of racial inequalities, racial economic inequality, and the foundation of racial economic inequalities of racial wealth divide, toning it down. The foundation of it all is white supremacy. A lot of audiences can't handle can't handle that, you know. I just want to go back to the point where it says white supremacy is a pre existing condition. Because we related white supremacy to George Floyd in the protests around police brutality, but it's also kind of amazed with the COVID crisis. Oh, how can it be, it's so surprising that black people are disproportionately dying, getting the disease or, you know, Native Americans, what have you and it's just like, yeah, it's not like white supremacy, we get the worst of everything. If there's a hurricane, we're gonna get the worst of it, right. If there's a health crisis, we're gonna get the worst of it. Because our entire structure is designed to ignore our needs as much as possible and serve others.

Dyalekt :

The key term is ignore. That's one of the tough things about explaining white supremacy. Saundra was really pointing to that, about how people can be touchy about it. Because folks are like, Hey, you know, the moon landing, right? When people are always like, you know, the moon landing couldn't have been fake because it would take so much effort to, like, do all these things. You know, it's not that white supremacy is requiring a lot of effort of people. All it requires of people is apathy.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah, people need to like, yeah, you know, I'm just kind of okay with that. I also like the phrase white supremacy as as a way to define this problem, because it is way more specific than the word racism. Yeah. I think when you talk about racism, there's so many people are like, well, Asian people can be racist. Black people can be racist too. And all this stuff.

Dyalekt :

That's a whole next episode.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

A whole other thing. I want to go back to Kaz McDonald thank you for your comments. Please, please, there needs to be talked about light skinned latin people having this racist mentality as well. This mentality just heavily in the latin community and needs to be addressed. And then continuing on, I would also like to see data if light skinned latin people make more money, are in a better position than darker skinned Latin people. Oh, those are great comments. And I think that goes was right along with the white supremacy conversation of there's a light skinned privilege no matter what your race is because of white supremacy, right?

Dyalekt :

Yeah. I mean, yeah, I you know, as a light skinned black man, I assumed within my own family, it's one of those things where like with police and stuff like that, it is very much been if I'm in a car with my cousins, and the cops come to pull us over, I'm the one that they have to speak to. Because I know that I can have a conversation with them without things getting out of control.

Diedrich Asante Mohamad :

And also too, it's like, the weird ethnic demographic divisions we have in this country. We oftentimes forget, you know, like, Spanish people are European. They are like this. They have white supremacy too, right? So this idea that just because you're a quote unquote Latino, doesn't necessarily explain it all where you are in the racial caste system from your native country, right? Like in a you know, and like I saw this my traveled Peru, and most of Latin America, the blacker you were or the more indigenous you were, the more likely you were to be poor and disenfranchised, right? And I was amazed to go to Peru and see these billboards with all these tall blondes. And I was like, that doesn't look like almost anyone I see here. And in Lima, which is where it was. But you know, white supremacy was the foundation of much of the modern day Western modern day Americans, right. European settler colonial people came in to establish the white supremacy order.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Oh, yeah, global I mean, well, Asian countries too.

Dyalekt :

About Peru to give some like other anecdotal stuff. I have a Peruvian friend who's Afro Peruvian very much into his African roots. And he talks about how the term Indio or indigenous is used as an insult. And then I spoke to another Peruvian cat who was light skinned and blonde haired, and I asked him about that it's completely different settings some years later, and he was like, I don't know what you're talking about. Indio is an insult, no, noone would ever do that.

Diedrich Asante Mohamad :

Actually Sondra from Sage.money, made a comment about the myth of white supremacy. And I think, you know, some people want to get beyond this idea that of course, white people aren't inherently Supreme. Right. So that is a myth. But the reality is socioeconomically, they are supreme. And that is what we have to be deconstruct in this country to make that a falsehood because my belief is that as long as the socio economic reality, it's hard to get rid of that prejudice, that whites are supreme and blacks are lower, when socioeconomically blacks are low. You know, it's interesting, you know, just like the George Ford protest, they're saying defund the police. You know, we we need to defund white supremacy, right. Oh, yeah.

Dyalekt :

I mean you defund white supremacy and law enforcement will be defunded to the point where it just does the job that it's supposed to do. Yeah. Rather than be connected to slave patrols and doing all those same jobs.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Right, exactly. They're actually doing public safety work. And I think that's the thing. I just want to go back to some of these comments because they are really fantastic. I think, Oh, thank you, everybody.

Dyalekt :

I can't read all of it with my son, he pulled my glasses off.

Diedrich Asante Mohamad :

I'm gonna step away for two seconds to close the door, my six year old opened.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Not from Kansas, white passing people, even in color communities will have races and support and participate in white supremacy. Again, I feel like and I see a lot of Asian Americans too, calling on their Asian American family and friends to be like, hey, you're part of this white supremacist system. And you are siding with white supremacy when you do that.

Dyalekt :

Can you share a little bit Pam about your go through some of these comments, but I would look like from your perspective, growing up Asian and also being from an Asian country that's not America, how white supremacy is global and affects y'all even when you're not around a lot of white people,

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

I mean, it's really true. I think, I think the the idea of just light skinned privilege and light skinned and as being better being superior being I mean, I saw that in my family just being an Asian American, and I see it now. I mean, I'm in some Filipino Facebook groups where Filipinos are the biggest white supremacist in a lot of ways, you know, because they believe that white people are better even though they are not that they actually believe that white people are better. They're better economically, they're better socially. All of these things. There's this there's this colonialism rooted in a lot of Asian American countries, and especially a country like the Philippines where we've been taught, you're conquered by Spain for 400 years. And then I saw the United States bought us for $20 million when we got our independence right in the 1940s. Or in the know in the in the late 1800s 1 million that's Like a basketball superstars yearly salary. Yeah. So the tricky thing about that I've seen in terms of the conversations with Asian Americans If we don't recognize the fact that as being pegged to the model minority, we are also feeding into the system of white supremacy and feeding into us remaining as minorities, right? And feeding into us remaining in a place where we are not equal. And I think that's the thing. That's the trick.

Diedrich Asante Mohamad :

Yeah. And part of the challenge is just like, you know, this is getting caught, I think very deep into it. But part of the challenge for immigrant groups come to the US is they're often times coming to the US to be part of a white supremacist system, even though you don't maybe think that's what you're doing. But to kind of get the level of wealth and kind of concentrated wealth that is in the Western world, which is the white world came from world domination, came from white supremacy, and it happens in all communities.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Oh, no, I'm just seeing in the comments. People are mentioning skin bleaching in the Philippines. I saw Candace mentioned, like, tattooing, yeah, sage money saying skin bleaching is a real thing in Africa.

Diedrich Asante Mohamad :

Or in the US right? I mean the idea that you know, black men used to get their hair straightend to be like a trainer and and up until not that long ago, most black women were getting their hair straight and just don't do it. And I also to I mean, I think a real challenge to a lot of groups that say they're doing anti racist work is are we fighting to end white supremacy? Are we fighting a lot of diversity and inclusion? What was wrong? It's like I would have marked in the white a white institution. That's right coffee. Thank you, Sondra.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

No, I love it. Wait, I want to go back to Tashi's question. This is awesome. Can you read it?

Dyalekt :

Yeah. How come talking about money is so rare among people of color? What can we do about the scarcity mindset hanging on to shitty jobs that support white supremacy white privilege just because we need money? Because how many times will we have this entire conversation and somebody will Like, yeah, whatever. Yeah, cool and all and I agree, but I gotta make money right now.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah, yeah. And it's hard because it's like, it feels like that we're all just fighting for the same scraps. I think that's the other thing that's so hard, right?

Diedrich Asante Mohamad :

And I'll take you in a different way I think sometimes too, which is why I love doing this work. People like Saundra, oftentimes people want to talk about dismantling white supremacy or racism will get so high levels that they don't also talk about, well, how do you survive in this, it is a white supremacist. Now you know, you are making a little bit of money, what are the practical steps you can take to strengthen your ability to survive and hopefully thrive while you are trying to dismantle a the superstructure which we all live in? It's very reminds me of that, quote, Jesus would say, you know, what to be in the world but not have it or something like that. That we need to have is not enough people who are doing both people who are doing financial survival skills are just focused on that. People are talking about deconstructing white supremacy over there. You got to bring those things together.

Dyalekt :

No, no, that makes a lot of sense. I'm seeing a lot of really good stuff Sage money, not from Kansas dropping in, Auntie Grandma, they destroyed people, because history in the US make it hard to support work of Colored People in the workforce

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

we taught we straight up are taught not to talk about money.

Dyalekt :

Yeah, well, I want to go to this one thing, because I was talking about this, that Caste was saying extreme capitalism protects white supremacy and vice versa. White supremacy sets the foundation for hyper capitalism to exist. And you say, in my opinion, but actually, that's facts right there. When we talk about desegregation and facts. The reason why desegregation didn't end up working out for black folks is because of zero sum hyper capitalism. Because the businesses that were owned by black people were not supported by white people initially, maybe there might have been some campaigns or things where they could have gotten going, but because of capitalism, like that they weren't supported. They went out and they had no ability to come back. The white owned businesses were buoyed by that and strengthened to the point where now they're massive institutions that are too big to fail. Yeah. It's really great stuff. Ooh, thank you for everybody. Y'all got so much stuff going on here. Oh, man, this is why we kill each other while we compete with each other. Why we are trained to believe that when someone gets something it's taking from our piece of the pie. That is not true. Yes, like really? Exactly. The I think we don't talk enough about the way that zero sum competition and that type of capitalism really plays into the mindset because when you talk about Asian people, and how they're Filipino people who are like yes, we believe in white supremacy, it's because they've been conquered, right? So they're like, well, you guys won. So you must be correct about this. Right. And there's so much about I mean, it's one of the reasons why our president is the president. Yeah, he's someone who has been rich as long as people know. So if you've been rich, as long as I know, you must have done something right. You must be superior. That's just what you're saying.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

So if we're talking About how to some capitalism doesn't work Diedrich. It works for some folks. I feel like it leaves most of us in the dust, Diedrich, and we got a preview of your report. Thank you for sending out to us. I would love to talk about

Dyalekt :

So by the way, the white supremacy as a pre existing condition is not just a great title, we came up with it we did not come up with to come with it.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Diedrich and it's super policy studies have a whole report that's coming out next week with eight solutions on how to actually ensure economic recovery reduces the racial wealth divide because remember, we're still in a global pandemic. 40 million people unemployed. People are getting sick all the time. We don't have universal health care. People don't have jobs, people might get evicted next month. What do we do about all this Diedrich? Fix it?

Diedrich Asante Mohamad :

Well, yeah. I'll get into some of these eight solutions, but it's it gets very much of the point that was being made before. If everybody's scrapping individually. So everybody's working Individually for scraps, we get stuck in the same cycle. Thats why so much of our programs are, you know, mass programs that would, you know, make it to all people are less, financially insecure, because we all have more financial security, we don't have to feel like that every advance by one person is a decline for someone else. And I think, you know, that's one of the been the great points, great weaknesses of the United States is you don't have a very strong social infrastructure. And I think we saw that with COVID, right. We saw the weak public health systems, the weak, even got an education communication system, all these things have helped make the United States the number one western country in terms of COVID cases in the entire world. Which is kind of crazy since we are the wealthiest and have some of the greatest technology that we've been also the greatest failure in, in containing the COVID public health crisis.

Dyalekt :

And you know what one of the biggest things about that, particularly with this health crisis, but I think you know, in Katrina and other natural disasters, too, one of the biggest things that I want to charge white supremacy with is conspiracy theory. The whole conspiracy theory outbreak and problem comes from the actual conspiracy of white supremacy, folks hiding it and making all these terrible types of decisions, or your cointelpro, or your Tuskegee, all of these things that have made it so no matter who you are, you probably don't trust anything that the government or media is saying. So at this point, even when good information is out there, it's so hard to get ahold of it and verify it. And I think that that is entirely not because not only that, I mean, a lot of these current conspiracies spring out of trying to rationalize how white supremacy doesn't work for a lot of people. So it's just a mess on all fronts. And I think the confusion thing is one of the biggest parts of it. By the way, I wanted to shout out more great stuff being said by everybody in the comments. Cast talking about being on the show, and you know, you've been killing it. So you got my vote. Yeah. Reach out, reach out. Be Awesome. Not broke. I really want to mention about state that successful black businesses and capital actively destroyed. This is what we're talking about, about the slave patrol and how they move, you know? Oh, yes. And I'm loving y'all. Y'all also just rapping with each other. Everybody's building a coalition,

Diedrich Asante Mohamad :

This is my first Instagram Live experience, it is very different and I'm enjoying it a lot of things happening.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

So why don't we start with going through these aid solutions. We don't have to go through them all. But I think some of them just from looking at them are one unique I haven't heard of it before. And also they seem to be trying to address the economic impact in two different phases, right? There's emergency stuff that needs to happen, and there's long term stuff that needs to happen so we don't go through this again. And then we can start dismantling the white supremacist system that you none of us really benefit from.

Diedrich Asante Mohamad :

And two, there's a phase three called painful policies. And I saw someone was saying we need to tax the F out of Amazon. And in that section, there is a section not just on Amazon, but breaking up concentrated wealth, because the currency the tax system, so there's phase three paying for policies. And we talk a lot about emergency millionaire surge taxes, reversing upside down tax subsidies is one thing I always like to talk about, that the country spends over $700 billion a year in wealth and asset development. It's just the problem is most of that money goes to the wealthy. So we are reinvesting and concentrating wealth at 700 billion a year, every year. So one of the most basic things we could do, is it the increase in spending, just use that 700 billion and has a much more focused on the asset for the rewarding the wealthy from being wealthy, you know, but there is a whole tax section to this document.

Dyalekt :

Yeah, no, I feel that and I want to ask a question of Pam. From your personal finance perspective, because I know a lot of people again, the like siding with the winner thing a lot of people will hear that that, you know, we reinvest in these already successful companies and be like, well, that makes sense. They've already proven that they're successful. So they should get the money to continue to grow and build if we were to give the money to less successful companies or new companies, they don't have the track record, so maybe they wouldn't be able to grow the economy, you get what I'm saying? Why is that? Why is that not correct?

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

I have an education agst for you. Do y'all remember "no child left behind?" Right? The schools that had the best test scores got more money than the schools who had the worst test scores cuz that makes no fucking sense. That's all we're doing right now. The thing is that the stock market and this economy is built upon quarterly earnings. It's built upon public companies making more and more money every single quarter instead of building sustainable businesses. They're built upon CEOs who are around for six months or a year or two years. Make their money and they cut and run no matter what the state of the company is. And that is the problem. The problem is that the system is broken. So the people who are winning in the system are winning in a system that is broken, that is fixed that is designed for them to win. And so how do we undo that? Because the tax code is one of the main reasons why so many of these companies are able to reinvest in themselves, because instead of paying their workers more money, they're relying on the government to provide welfare to provide public housing, instead of reinvesting in infrastructure and having a diverse board and reinvesting in like lowering their carbon emissions. They're all for the profit. So what do we do about that? And I feel like the tax code is one of the ways that the rich have very much snuck in all of their own welfare policies, right.

Dyalekt :

Yes, that's right. So what you're saying is, there's a difference between given you know, the Lakers won the championship last year, given them the first round draft pick, like that's one thing, but it's something else entirely. To give them an unlimited budget while all the other 29 teams have a salary cap.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah, that makes no sense.

Diedrich Asante Mohamad :

Well, yeah. I mean, even sports, right? So it's the worst teams, they get the number one draft pick.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Right? Right. Even sports is more makes more sense,

Diedrich Asante Mohamad :

Because they know that in order to keep people interested in NFL or NBA, one team can't win for 20 years, because it gets in your local market, you know, will go down so they understand. They built some equity in their system. But we haven't built equity in our overall socio economic system. And I'll just go over four things that we think can help build some equity, emerging from the recession. We didn't get into the things to do immediately. But some of the things like universal health expansion, obviously, there should be a Medicare for All because if you know what, what a bad idea is to have your job tied to your healthcare, right because if you lose your job, you shouldn't lose your healthcare too, right.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

It took a global pandemic for us to realize that.

Dyalekt :

Just even saying that as a sentence, right, like having your job tied your your healthcare, like it's one thing to be like I make money for rent and all that stuff for my health care. Yeah, for my job. And yes, I need my job. But the idea that it's so much more of an unfair agreement, right, because our job is an agreement between two parties, right? Yeah. And it seems like so if I lose my health care if I stopped working with you, I have no negotiating power.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

It has stopped people I know from quitting their jobs because they don't have health care and healthcare is completely unaffordable in this country.

Diedrich Asante Mohamad :

That's right. And it stops people from starting businesses or anything that doesn't provide health care, right. And it's even prevents small businesses for me to even be able to hire people because they can't afford the medical costs. Right. So you know, so that was universal health care, expansion, expand housing and ownership. I mean, we've seen that affordable housing is a huge issue across the country as well as home ownership. I was looking over the data earlier today. I mean black white inequality, homeownership and pretty much stagnant since 1970s. Right? It's like African American homeownership rates about 44% and whites around 70%, maybe 71%, 69%. We haven't seen a bridge of that, like 40 years, right, which is crazy. So there and again, you know, I want to bring up, White's became majority homeowners, when not they just all of a sudden decided to build homes all decided to save when they when we completely recreated a homeownership program that allowed people to put only 10% down 20% down. We also had the GI Bill, which allowed for mass subsidies for for homeownership, and that's when whites became majority homeowners. And we haven't had that type of investment into homeownership into the masses to the blacks and Latinos since that time, and homeownership is the number one source of wealth for most people. So unless we address that issue, home ownership, and of course affordable housing, we're not going to really bridge racial wealth inequality by that much.

Dyalekt :

I also want to plug the Fair Housing and racial justice podcast that's also part of the race and wealth network. If that's something that you're care about and want to know more things about the folks at NCRC go deep into like, I don't think I'm equipped to really have those conversations. I know you work at NCRC so you know a little bit more but if you want to get deep dives into that check out that podcast Yes.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Check for Race and Wealth wherever you listen to podcast

Diedrich Asante Mohamad :

Real quick, also not broke but affirmative action programs for white people and I'm not sure and then and then we also not broke recommended the color of laws great book not broke also knows that there's a book called when affirmative action was for white people that gets into the all of those issues. So I don't know, two dozen books pulling from that title, or is just making a point. And I want you know, there is a book called when affirmative action was for white people and it's very helpful and going over these issues. Just two other policies we put forward is federal jobs guarantee with living wage again. Oh, good. You're also not broke does recognize it because he's reading a book right now. But federal jobs guarantee with living wage. Again, African Americans have had generally twice the unemployment of whites since the 1960s. And yeah, and right now, black unemployment around 16, almost 17%. So again, you can't have to be in this country, any type of financial security when you have such a high proportion of your population unemployed. You know, again, even even with a record low levels of unemployment, the blacks had pre-Covid, it was still like 6%, which is like recessionary for white people. So we really need a federal jobs guarantee. And then finally, we had this thing, baby bonds Sandy daredi Derek Hamilton, I talked about this idea of, you know, giving money and investing money to every child as their born and then when they're 18 or 21, they can reap some of the rewards of that and get, you know, maybe 50,000 or whatever the total dollar amount is. It reminds me of, I heard Jesse Jackson talking about trying to be in a capitalist society with no capital and how it just doesn't work, right. And that's the problem we need to have. All of us have to have capital, if we're going to have some type of market society where capital is so important for moving forward in any way.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah, I remember Mayor Tom said something similar at the prosperity now summit is you can't expect people to manage money or learn how to manage money if they have no money to manage. That's one of the biggest things at the end of the day. Oh, so sleepy.

Dyalekt :

I do want to acknowledge by the way y'all are killing it in the chat here. I can't even say all of this stuff. Y'all have an entire I want to make a transcript and have a next report just from the stuff that y'all are saying. Shouting out D talking about how you knew the effects personally of No Child Left Behind. Shout out to all the teachers because I remember back in the day when if you were getting No Child Left Behind funding, you had to lie. Yeah, to actually do something that affected the students positively. Yeah, I know, that was such a terrible thing. See a lot of people talking about corporations and corporate welfare and how, you know, just I think it's really great that we're starting to acknowledge the idea that what is the thing, socialism for the rich and rugged individualism for the rest of us? Yeah. Yeah, yeah. Yeah. Chomsky. Exactly.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

I would love it. So one of the things actually stood out to us in their part two is this idea of coastal banking, the people of color are underbanked or unbanked, they don't have access to non predatory lending have access to non predatory banking, and also the current banking institutions are predatory for people of color. So I'd love to hear what this idea of postal banking is and what that could be for communities of color in terms of access.

Diedrich Asante Mohamad :

Yeah, and postal banking was one of the measures we had in phase one as an emergency measure that should be dealt with now. You know what I think, you know, one of the things is to visit a Naomi Klein talks about what crisis capitalism or something like that. Yeah. As a way to weaken, whatever public infrastructure we've had, whatever infrastructure there is. And I think we're seeing that with postal banking, right, it's like there's been an ongoing drive to, which is kind of crazy to kind of destroy the US postal system. And I think there's different estimates that unless Congress changes, things could go broke this summer, but we're trying to do the exact opposite. And, you know, the post office is a, you know, national infrastructure that doesn't need to be destroyed, but needs to be strengthened. And part of it can be strengthened many other countries is that the post office isn't just a place where you can mail things. It's also a place where you can get some financial services right? issue I was looking at, again, some stats this morning. And we're seeing how what is it? I think 47% of African Americans are underbanked or non banked. And 43% of Latinos are underbanked or non banks, right? And being underbanked would mean that your that you use alternative financial institutions for basic financial services. And I think something like postal banking, where you all had a postal banking network that would provide basic financial services would really cut down on some of the predatory practices we engage in in order to kind of keep ourselves going in this car.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

That would be so huge, because I know, there were talks of trying to shut down the post office because it wasn't profitable. It wasn't supporting itself. It wasn't sustaining itself. It needed its own emergency bailout, because it does a lot of services for at cost to basically serve as many people in America as possible.

Dyalekt :

D and Kaz have been chatting a lot about distractions and morals and bringing a lot about media and art and I just saw that you had the quote from the sound of the police BDP. Your laws are minimal because he won't even think about looking at the real criminals. Shout out with all the cameras that we're having today, you know, again, he was talking about. But like, the art is such a real thing. You know, during the COVID stuff, Pam and I have done a bunch of like comfort bingeing, watching old movies, and you'd be amazed how many 80s and 90s films are just about some cop trying to do the right thing, but everybody wants to stop him with their rules and regulations. Yeah, and we should all listen to the cop. Even like one of the comfort TV shows that we watch that you know, we all we like watching Brooklyn Nine Nine because it's like a diverse group of police that actually want to help people. And I saw somebody saying that what they should do for Brooklyn Nine Nine is next season without saying why you're making any announcement about it, just change it to a post office. Same thing, same jobs cuz like, we don't have art and media that's like, yo, the post office is awesome. All we have is that like, remember in the 90s when they shot up a bunch of people, but we have millions of movies and shows and art and media about how cops are doing their best to try to help us out. They just canceled the show cops after 31 years, just cancelled it.

Diedrich Asante Mohamad :

You know, I'm kind of I've got going on, I don't know, a side point here, but I do one thing that you find challenging, I'm glad that they took down the Robert leaves, or they're going to take down the Robert E. Lee statue in Richmond, Virginia, that says a lot about racial progress in this country that a General who lost 160 years ago in a city that has a black mayor, they're just announcing they're going to take down that statue, right like, again, the cops TV show was on for 30 something years, you know, we've been dealing with these issues. And and now they're taking it down. So I'll take the progress, but I really do would like things more substantive. You know, yeah. Want to statues down? But can we also get some real programs to actually change the situation on the ground and not just take down the symbolic forms of white supremacy but let's take down the real material foundations of white supremacy.

Dyalekt :

I think that they go hand in hand. I'm seeing lots of folks talking about in the chats you know cuz I'm paraphrasing but another rhyme, "we got money for wars we can't feed the poor". D talking about bad boys and how people love I loved it and all of these arts like even I really appreciate Reno 911 is better than cops. No, I just found out that Reno 911, that show was 100% improv. No, they had no script.

Diedrich Asante Mohamad :

And I'll go back because I've never seen Reno 911 or the other one you're talking about Brooklyn, but me and my kids we watch a pretty much all white Andy Griffith Show. But what I love about that is it's just like, you know, like, he doesn't carry your gun. You know what I mean? Just walking around, talking to people Always de escalating. That was always my my idea of you know what law enforcement is going to be.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

I would like to take your comment a step further Diedrich about taking down the symbols and focusing on substance is need new fucking symbols, right? We need artists to come up with what are the new symbols that actually uphold a racial economic equity inclusion type of thing.

Dyalekt :

And make it easier for folks to understand how to get there.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah, exactly because right now art and media are the reason why we're here in so many ways they've convinced us with the things that feels symbolic to us with the things that we can relate to that this is just common sense right. Dyaleckt, you say that all the freakin time. This has become common sense. And we have to undo that and we have to unlearn that.

Diedrich Asante Mohamad :

And I think it's more actually our kind of white supremacy system, you know, that produces art and imagery to reinforce it right. Like, you know and again go back to what is the Birth of a Nation right one of the kind of most important beginning movies you know, like how important that is for now they're talking about taking down a what's that called the Scarlett O'Hara, Gone with the Wind. Yep.

Dyalekt :

Yeah, Birth of a Nation used to be in film school used to have to take it it was mandatory odd to watch it and talk about it because it they talked about how it invented certain types of close ups and things like that, that people still use. So people were forced to watch he was forced to be kept around, because it was a great work.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Wow. And thank you, everybody for helping us get the baby to nap.

Dyalekt :

Yeah. Wow. And all this racial economic inequality be keeping him from being able to sleep. So y'all been up in the breath.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

So yeah, I feel like we talked a lot about the big issues. We talked about some solutions. What can we do about it? What can we do as individuals Diedrich? Are we voting for a certain thing.

Dyalekt :

There's so many people saying stuff is like donate here vote the protest. They're like, What is? And I can also think about our own lane. Yeah. Well,

Diedrich Asante Mohamad :

And so I think that is like, I think the takeaway is we have to put into our daily lives, how we are going to continue to try to take down these structures and create new ones, right. So voting will be a part of it, but also something that happens once a year or once every couple of years. How you spend your money, are you are you, you know, trying to support smaller businesses, minority businesses, are you looking for, you know, a CDFI, community development financial institutions, banks are, you know, are you participating in local organizations that are trying to help address these issues? You know, are you talking to the police departments what they're doing? I mean, we all have to figure out how to do these things in our lives. And thank you for saying she's cute. This is my oldest eight year old Jemison, who's joined us for the end of this conversation.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

You have to have at least one kid around.

Dyalekt :

Well, you know, but it's great to have the babies here with it. Like, a lot of times with this stuff, it's always like, Well, what do I say to my kids? When do I start bringing my kids into this stuff? I'm gonna be putting out we said, I'm gonna make an IGTV thing about this, but like, by my lights skinned behind, I'm black, but I didn't really know I was black till people started questioning about that, because you know, when your family you just are with your peoples. Yeah. And, I remember I found out I was black when a police officer came to my first grade class, and I came home and my mom said, what did the police officer teach you? And I said, he taught me to not take things from strangers to be careful and to not trust black people.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

He said that In the class?

Dyalekt :

He said that in the class, that's the thing that I came home and told my mom about. This was within our lifetimes.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

If White supremacy is this pre existing condition, right, we're suggesting that It is a disease that needs to be, you know, cured. What is the cure?

Dyalekt :

Well, I've been saying that I think it's an addiction in terms of like the type of disease. It's one of those things where like, those things it's it's hard to let go of. It's a little bit sexier.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

White supremacy is an addiction.

Dyalekt :

When you saw that, that one white lady in Central Park, who had that crazy meltdown, and she like started screaming all day and she was like, my only response to watching that kind of thing is like, that's what addiction does to you. I've seen people with addiction and I will make them act in ways that their rational self wouldn't be okay with and they will go to this extreme and dangerous place. Need to believe that the progression of human race is ultimately for individuals to act as bridges toward future generations that ultimately raise human consciousness. We need fighters in other words, everyone please make the world that you want to see after you die. Yeah, I'm gonna have to go to IG much more often because I did not know that quotes would be on these types of conversation so much more positive experience than I expected.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

When people hear we do we do they elevate the conversation. I love it. Yes. And we need to teach our kids. Yes, thank you now from Kansas for real. I mean, I think starting to address the racial wealth divide and starting to address financial resilience and financial literacy with your kids and starting to address race with your kids at every age. I've been seeing a lot of memes go around about that. And I think there's also something else to say Dyalekt about racism and how it turned from a word that meant systemic racism. And then it got hidden in our homes, right? Mm hmm.

Dyalekt :

Yeah, I mean, that's one of the things about the word racism, where like the ideas of reverse racism or you're racist towards that person, we started conflating all these other ideas because people who didn't have a good understanding of it, they would share minimally. The race conversation started to be like the sex conversation with parents and kids, were there like....uhhhhh, wear a condom? So like, the race conversation will be similar like, Oh, yeah, they're like, oh, everybody's the same. And that's kind of that and they're just like, I don't want to talk about it.

Diedrich Asante Mohamad :

I think I think like both subjects, it is easier to engage the younger they are before they're too caught up in it, you know, like we live. We live on former slave plantation. And the slave masters house is just a battle. No, it's not. It's it's right above the playground. And so I, you know, I take the kids up, and I always pointed out, that's the slave masters house, this used to be a plantation, and it just helps. And they call this thing that no one else does. And I don't understand people are crazy, particularly black people who have weddings there. I don't quite understand how people use it as a social gathering place. But, you know, just write letting them know from very early age that these things exist. This is the kind of structures were built upon, and now we're trying to make a better life. I think, you know, it's much easier to do when they're very young than waiting until they're trying to hide them from It can't hide from it as we all see, you can't. It's all on TV, it's all around us, they're going to bump into it. And so and so you have to introduce it to them. And so until we understand what they're encountering, you know, about, you know, things policy wise to address these issues. And I think these type of conversations are some of the personal things we can do.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah, I love it. I also wanted to shout out call me Stefan spice. I've worked retail my whole life. White supremacy is a glorified obsession. Yeah, yeah, that's another that's another way to think about it. And I feel like if we think about it as addictions and obsessions and things that people you know, can get over right and things that people can counter with different habits and with and with like a very clear like medicinal stuff. I don't know what that medicinal stuff is exactly in terms of like policy and things like that. But if we're able to really call it out as it is, yeah, and hiding shit just makes it worse for real but if I'm really able to call it out as it is, then we can start to actually create a new system.

Dyalekt :

Do you mean if we preach to the choir, they will know what to sing? This is all of our show, because this is really our mission. We do want to talk with y'all. That's why we have so many people who are in the comments who are learning and already have a lot of these ideas. You guys are sharing stuff we don't know we're showing up for some of y'all don't know. And it's really important for us to build this rousing chorus that can stamp out the silence of apathy. Yeah, and what we can do with that, guys, it's very simple. Sharing the things that you know, Cass was talking about being a nerd and the thing that you're a nerd about, I've always loved that, you know, the ideas of nerds are outcasts. They're also the people who care the most. The thing that you know the most and you care the most about that's your lane and share that with people to the best of your ability. folks who have problems with it, folks will say that they're smarter or more capable with it, but trust me, honestly, I swear and if you're not sure if we need you call me literally call me text me email me. We need you. I know you right being a nerd. If I superpower that really is. That's what's going on right now people are using their nerdy superpowers, the Kpop kids out there flooding the racist hashtags with their Kpop memes. That's the stuff they care about. That's their power. Our This is what we can do. It's what we can do together. Well, thank you for being a part of this platform. This is the thing that we grow together. One thing I wanted to throw out and shout out to my nerds, as we're looking at stuff, there are a number of organizations that are popping up these. There's one in Austin called just america that's apparently negotiating with the police department. And there are a number of them that are not verified as being part of any movements right now. I think one thing that we can do is just check up on these organizations who are coming into the spot and see if they're real.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

Yeah, do do some due diligence. I want to read this comment from not from Kansas. We need a change in government before we change the policy. I'm involved in policy change for foster youth. There are so many laws that are enforced simply because politicians and police can get away with it, right? Yeah, for real it's one thing and that's the thing too, is like It's one thing for legislation to pass, it's another thing to actually have a checks and balances to make sure that things actually happen.

Diedrich Asante Mohamad :

I'll disagree a little bit in that I don't think one precedes the other. I just think you need both because I think it's very hard. It's very hard to get the politicians you want in, it's very hard to get the policy that you want in if you can get either at any point fight for that. And eventually the two will be one or the other. It's like yeah, cuz cuz you're right. laws passed all the time. Like, yeah, you know, like, like, we've had voting rights to eight balances. Right. Right. We're gonna be going to be enforced. Right? So yeah, you know, change the politicians, but also change the policies and maybe at some point, why good politicians and good policies, but don't, don't wait. You have to do one or the other. Just do whatever you can.

Dyalekt :

I think that's really important part is like, and thank you for that. I think we said we said date on our because I think that's the conclusion of what we can do. Like in terms of least and the most is building these things by checking and verifying with each other.

Pamela Capalad, CFP, AFC :

I love it. All right Dyalekt, take us out. Thank you so much for all your comments, all your engagement. We love it.

Dyalekt :

Please, if you have more ideas and thoughts, please continue to reach out to us we're going to share and we're going to be continuing to do this on Fridays live. We got a song that we're going to be playing when you check out the podcast version is called Liberation by a group called MCE from Pine Bluff Arkansas from their album death to white supremacy. By the way, I also want to shout out talk about art. Thank you. I when I was researching, trying to find songs, I not only found a lot of great rap songs and things like that called Death to white supremacy and white supremacy. But I was seeing in the heavy metal community around the world they have nws no white supremacy or SWF smash white supremacy. And I'm like, I'm just happy to see that artists around the world. They know what's up.

Diedrich Asante Mohamad :

You know, yeah. Yeah, yeah, it's good stuff. I'm with it.

Dyalekt :

And we'll check out next time. Thank you Please holler at us. When the podcast goes up, feel free to rate us, debate us, hate us and leave some comments and thoughts in there too. And feel free to reach out to us in between and ask any questions that you have about any of the stuff going on. When we get on, we'll check you out next time. Thank you so much. Thank you,

Song - Liberation by MCE :

Appealing for holier. Place to be this Emancipation Proclamation given to us by this nation, by the same racist crackers who got rich cause they enslave oppressor did not tell us what was free. We believe them now the master and the slave. Follow them demons Then now with him with Jim Crow with his sister he's so busy pouring genocides homicide suicide suicide causes of death but the religion ain't free but ahefty price take back your life take backokay call plus a Copa again the ways that ancient panda went back in case you gotta get my liberation. Yeah, liberation for your dogs if we're racing for your dogs if we're racing for your dog racing for your dog eration for your dog, liberation for your dog gotcha. liberation for your dog liberation for your liberation for your dog liberation for your dog liberation for your dog liberation for your dog gotcha. Salutations salutation eyes focused in the gaze man and by the anti nature Sophie Got Papa native and they hate it outdoor repeat carbon dating comments are a bit of a pain in the spirit melatonin got the whole foods give me energy they decided last and got you with the drugs in the local white supremacy is still intact by up. They said that we were attacking Jeffrey Dahmer Psalm 82 with a microcosm mother Guna activate shutdown it's gotta be falling you continue to get off and you came by your liberation so system make me nauseous liberation for your dog liberation for your dog racer for your dog eration for your dog's liberation for your dog's liberation for your dog gotcha home protected. liberation, freedom, liberation for your dog liberation for your dog liberation for your dog liberation for you. Dog liberation for your dog gotcha all weapons training in martial arts and everything potential weapon learn how to use it properly so you can do the preparations critical, never safe to Sabri brothers after unpredicted meditation breathing enemy come to the season teach them babies hand a hand the chocolate Rice's reason Liberation's in London for my people I won't get my brother RBG my mama didn't raise no kill a buffet car take your life on the cheek turn and we do is when we scan into the perimeter for picking off them in the midst of a demo sinister liberation for your dogs. If we're racing for your dogs if we're racer for your dog dogs are all protected. liberation for your dog liberation for your dogs eraser for your dog gotcha eraser For your dog liberation for your dog liberation for your liberation for your dog liberation for your dog liberation for your dog gotcha. Hey Jim, Bob gratia right here Yeah, here I am liberation and everything blah blah blah blah blah. No, no, no, no